weirdwiki
weirdwiki:


The tempest prognosticator, also known as the leech barometer, is a 19th-century invention by George Merryweather in which leeches are used in a barometer. The twelve leeches are kept in small bottles inside the device; when they become agitated by an approaching storm they attempt to climb out of the bottles and trigger a small hammer which strikes a bell. The likelihood of a storm is indicated by the number of times the bell is struck.

Tempest prognosticator

weirdwiki:

The tempest prognosticator, also known as the leech barometer, is a 19th-century invention by George Merryweather in which leeches are used in a barometer. The twelve leeches are kept in small bottles inside the device; when they become agitated by an approaching storm they attempt to climb out of the bottles and trigger a small hammer which strikes a bell. The likelihood of a storm is indicated by the number of times the bell is struck.

Tempest prognosticator

peashooter85

peashooter85:

The Snail Telegraph,

In the mid 19th century a French occultist named Jacques Toussaint Benoit theorized that if a pair of snails touched, they would form a special telepathic link that could not be severed by distance.  To cash in on his theory, he built a machine called the “pasilalinic-sympathetic compass”, also known as the snail telegraph.  The machine consisted of a box with 24 small cages each holding a snail which corresponded with a certain letter of the alphabet.  A corresponding device held another 24 snails which were supposedly linked with the snails of the first device.  When the operator touch a snail, the snail of the corresponding letter on the other device would supposedly react by wiggling.

Benoit demonstrated a working device to a journalist with the French newspapaer La Presse and his financial backer, a man named Monsieur Trait . The journalist was convinced that the snail telegraph worked, but Triat was much more skeptical, and demanded a stricter test done under scientific conditions.  Benoit agreed, but skipped out of town and disappeared before the second test could be conducted.

oupacademic
oupacademic:


It was 112 years ago in July that young engineer Willis Carrier unveiled the plans for his “Apparatus for Treating Air,” a contraption that was designed to lower the humidity in a Brooklyn printing plant. There was a bonus; it could cool the air, too. So thank you, Mr. Carrier. Once again, with the thermometer climbing into the Yow! zone, it’s time to celebrate your invention.

Salvatore Basile, author of Cool: How Air Conditioning Changed Everything, reflects on the history of our favorite summertime appliance.
Image: Drawing of Fan Moved by Mechanism, 11/27/1830-11/27/1830. Public Domain via National Archives.

oupacademic:

It was 112 years ago in July that young engineer Willis Carrier unveiled the plans for his “Apparatus for Treating Air,” a contraption that was designed to lower the humidity in a Brooklyn printing plant. There was a bonus; it could cool the air, too. So thank you, Mr. Carrier. Once again, with the thermometer climbing into the Yow! zone, it’s time to celebrate your invention.

Salvatore Basile, author of Cool: How Air Conditioning Changed Everything, reflects on the history of our favorite summertime appliance.

Image: Drawing of Fan Moved by Mechanism, 11/27/1830-11/27/1830. Public Domain via National Archives.